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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in krinek's LiveJournal:

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Sunday, December 30th, 2012
9:05 pm
43. Triangle by Katharine Weber
Title: Triangle
Author: Katharine Weber
Publisher: Picador
Year: 2006
# of pages: 242
Date read: 12/29/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"By the time she dies at age 106, Esther Gottesfeld, the last survivor of the 1911 Triangle Shirtwaist fire, has told the story of that days many times. But her own role remains mysterious: How did she survive when at least 146 workers, her sister and fiancé among them, burned or jumped to their deaths? Are the gaps in her story just common mistakes, or has she deliberately concealed a secret over the years? As her granddaughter seeks the real story in the present day, a zealous feminist historian intrudes with her own set of conclusions, but it is Esther's voice echoing insistently through the decades that ultimately reveals the meaning of the tragedy.

A brilliant, haunting chronicle of the event that stood for ninety years as New York's most violent disaster, Triangle forces us to consider how we tell our stories, how we hear them, and how history is forged from unverifiable truths." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

This was a very good book about people and their stories. The ones they tell, and the ones told about them. I liked Esther's interactions with the interviewer as well as her granddaughter's friend George Bostwick composing music based on DNA.
Monday, December 10th, 2012
5:40 pm
42. Serpent's Reach by C.J. Cherryh
Title: Serpent's Reach
Author: C.J. Cherryh
Publisher: DAW
Year:1980
# of pages: 285
Date read: 12/9/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"The constellation of Hydri, known as the Serpent, is compact and obscure from Earth and remained so in the era of interstellar colonization. For it was under strict quarantine--harboring an intelligent race, powerful and alien. Yet there were human colonies within the Serpent's Reach, cut off from the galaxy beyond, with their own inbred culture, and their special relationships to the inhuman majat.

This is the novel of Raen, the last of the massacred Sul Family, and of her lifetime pledge to find vengeance. It was to take her across the worlds of the Reach into the very center of the alien webwork that knit the forbidden constellation into a complex of interbred cultures that no outsider could hope to unravel." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I liked this book set in a rich and complicated universe. I especially liked the way the majat are portrayed and how Raen interacts with them.
Friday, December 7th, 2012
5:30 pm
41. Murder at Government House by Elspeth Huxley
Title: Murder at Government House
Author: Elspeth Huxley
Publisher: Penguin
Year: 1937
# of pages: 231
Date read: 12/6/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Life in the colonial capital at Chania is relaxed and blooming, barring the odd hiccough in the regional railways, but Olivia Brandeis, a young anthropologist working in the region, senses that there is trouble brewing. When the Governor is found strangled at his desk, her suspicions are confirmed. Falicious rumors fly as Inspector Vachell tries to sort out conflictng accusations and find a real suspect. Then Olivia relates her encounter with a tribal witch doctor--and an even more terrifying series of events begins to unfold." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I liked this mystery set in Africa during the colonial period. I especially liked Vachell and Olivia working together to figure out who killed the Governor and why. I look forward to reading the next book in the series, Murder on Safari.
Friday, November 16th, 2012
8:12 pm
40. The Voyage by Philip Caputo
Title: The Voyage
Author: Philip Caputo
Publisher: Vintage Books
Year: 1999
# of pages: 416
Date read: 11/15/2012
Rating: 3*5 = good

Description:

"On a June morning in 1901, Cyrus Braithwaite commands his three sons to set sail from their Maine home aboard the family's forty-six-foot schooner and not return until September. Though confused and hurt by their father's cold-blooded order, the three brothers soon rise to the occasion and embark on a breathtakingly perilous journey down the East Coast, headed for the Florida Keys.

Almost a hundred years later, Cyrus's great-granddaughter Sybil sets out to uncover the events that transpired on the voyage. Her discoveries about the Braithwaite family and the America they lived in unfolds into a stunning tale of intrigue, murder, lies, and deceit.

In the tradition of great seafaring adventures, The Voyage is an intricately plotted, superbly detailed, and gripping story of adventure and courage. Pulitzer Prize-winning author Philip Caputo has written a timeless novel about the dangerous, reverberating effects of long-held family secrets." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

This is a very good book about adventure and family. I especially liked the brothers learning to work together in the storms.
Saturday, November 10th, 2012
5:15 pm
39. Running Away to Home by Jennifer Wilson
Title: Running Away to Home
Author: Jennifer Wilson
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Year: 2011
# of pages: 317
Date read: 11/9/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"'We can look at this in two ways,' Jim wrote, always the pragmatist. 'We can panic and scrap the whole idea. Or we can take this as a sign. They're saying the economy is going to get worse before it gets better. Maybe this is the kick in the pants we needed to do something completely different. There will always be an excuse not to go. . . .'

And that, friends, is how a typically sane middle-aged mother decided to drag her family back to a forlorn mountain village in the backwoods of Croatia.

So begins the author's journey in Running Away to Home. Jen, her architect husband Jim, and their two children had been living the typical soccer-and-ballet-practice life in the most Middle American of places: Des Moines, Iowa. They overindulged themselves and their kids, and as a family they were losing one another in the rush of work, school, and activities. One day, Jen and her husband looked at each other--both holding their Starbucks coffee as they headed out to their SUV in the mall parking lot, while the kids complained about the inferiority of the toys they just got--and asked themselves: 'Is this the American dream? Because if it is, it sort of sucks.'

Jim and Jen had always dreamed of taking a family sabbatical in another country, so when they lost half their savings in the stock-market crash, it seemed like just a crazy enough time to do it. High on wanderlust, they left the troubled landscape of contemporary America for the Croatian mountain village of Mrkopalj, the land of Jennifer's ancestors. It was a village that seemed hermetically sealed for the last one hundred years, with a population of eight hundred (mostly drunken) residents and a herd of sheep milling around the post office. For several months they lived like locals, from milking the neighbor's cows to eating roasted pig on a spit to desperately seeking the village recipe for bootleg liquor. As the Wilson-Hoff family struggled to stay sane (and warm), what they found was much deeper and bigger than themselves." -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this book of not only researching family history, but living in the ancestors' home village and meeting new relatives. I liked how Jen learned not to stand outside as an observer but instead participate in daily activities, thus making new and valued friends.
Sunday, October 21st, 2012
3:32 pm
38. Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout
Title: Olive Kitteridge
Author: Elizabeth Strout
Publisher: Random House
Year: 2008
# of pages: 270
Date read: 10/20/2012
Rating:3*/5 = good


Description:

"At times stern, at other times patient, at times perceptive, at other times in sad denial, Olive Kitteridge, a retired schoolteacher, deplores the changes in her little town of Crosby, Maine, and in the world at large, but she doesn’t always recognize the changes in those around her: a lounge musician haunted by a past romance; a former student who has lost the will to live; Olive’s own adult child, who feels tyrannized by her irrational sensitivities; and her husband, Henry, who finds his loyalty to his marriage both a blessing and a curse.

As the townspeople grapple with their problems, mild and dire, Olive is brought to a deeper understanding of herself and her life --- sometimes painfully, but always with ruthless honesty. Olive Kitteridgeoffers profound insights into the human condition --- its conflicts, its tragedies and joys, and the endurance it requires." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I liked this book about a small town in Maine and the people who live there. At first, I considered Olive to be aloof, but as the book progressed, I discovered she was more than I thought.
Friday, October 12th, 2012
1:37 pm
37. Machine Man by Max Barry
Title: Machine Man
Author: Max Barry
Publisher: Vintage Books
Year: 2011
# of pages: 274
Date read: 10/11/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"Scientist Charles Neumann loses a leg in an industrial accident. It's not a tragedy. It's an opportunity. Charlie always thought his body could be better. His employer, military contractor Better Future, has the resources Charlie needs to explore a few ideas. He begins to build parts. Better parts.

Prosthetist Lola Shanks admires a good artificial limb and Charlie admires Lola. In Charlie, she sees a man on his way to becoming artificial everything. Others see a madman. Others still, a product. And Better Future sees a weapon of unparalleled potential." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this book. I liked the mix of human and machine and the way Charlie became more human as he replaced parts of himself.
Sunday, September 23rd, 2012
1:29 pm
36. Heat Rises by Richard Castle
Title: Heat Rises
Author: Richard Castle
Publisher: Hyperion
Year: 2011
# of pages: 301
Date read: 9/22/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"The bizarre murder of a parish priest at a New York bondage club opens Nikki Heat's most thrilling and dangerous case so far, pitting her against New York's most vicious drug lord, an arrogant CIA contractor, and a shadowy death squad out to gun her down. And that is just the tip of an iceberg that leads Nikki Heat to a dark conspiracy that reaches all the way to the highest level of the NYPD.

But when she gets too close to the truth, Nikki finds herself disgraced, stripped of her badge and out on her own as a target for killers, with nobody she can trust. Except maybe the one man in her life who’s not a cop: reporter Jameson Rook.

In the midst of New York’s coldest winter in a hundred years, there’s one thing Nikki is determined to prove: Heat Rises." -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this third book of the "Nikki Heat" series. It was fast-paced and it kept me guessing throughout. I look forward to reading the next book, Frozen Heat.
Wednesday, September 19th, 2012
1:26 pm
35. The Xander Years by Keith R.A. DeCandido
Title: The Xander Years
Author: Keith R.A. DeCandido
Publisher: Pocket Books
Year: 1999
# of pages: 227
Date read: 9/18/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Unfulfilled crushes. Awkward first conversations. A date who wants you. . .dead.

Having a Y-chromsome in Sunnydale is never easy. But Buffy the Vampire Slayer's friend Xander Harris seems to find more than his share of trouble with the opposite sex.

At first Xander is happy being the teacher's pet--until his schoolboy crush brings out her true animal instincts. Then his whirlwind romance with the exotic foreign exchange student falters when she demands the ultimate sacrifice.

Some members of the Slaying squad might say that dating Cordelia Chase could kill a guy. But Xander's relationship with the high-maintenance Cordy actually seems to be working out--until she decides he's seriously harming her social standing. His craft plan to win her back may earn him more love than one guy can handle.

Now collected for the first time, are three stories from the hit TV series chronicling Xander's search for love on the Hellmouth." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

At first, I wasn't sure if I wanted to read stories based on a television show, even a show I like. But as I continued reading, I started to enjoy reading about Xander's misadventures and finding out how he saw things and what he thought.
Sunday, September 16th, 2012
1:21 pm
34. Emotional Geology by Linda Gillard
Title: Emotional Geology
Author: Linda Gillard
Publisher: Transita
Year: 2005
# of pages: 307
Date read: 9/15/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Rose Leonard is on the run from her life.

Taking refuge in a remote island community, she cocoons herself in work, silence and solitude in a house by the sea. But she is haunted by her past, by memories and desires she'd hoped were long dead.

Rose must decide whether she has in fact chosen a new life or just a different kind of death. Life and love are offered by new friends, her lonely daughter, and most of all Callum, a fragile younger man who has his own demons to exorcise.

But does Rose, with her tenuous hold on life and sanity, have the courage to say yes to life and put her past behind her?" -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

This was a moving story about love and art, strength and weakness, and learning to trust again. I liked the interaction between Rose and Callum and between Rose and her daughter Megan.
Friday, September 14th, 2012
8:25 pm
33. Naked Heat by Richard Castle
Title: Naked Heat
Author: Richard Castle
Publisher: Hyperion
Year: 2011
# of pages: 288
Date read: 9/13/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"When New York's most vicious gossip columnist, Cassidy Towne, is found dead, Heat uncovers a gallery of high profile suspects, all with compelling motives for killing the most feared muckraker in Manhattan.

Heat's murder investigation is complicated by her surprise reunion with superstar magazine journalist Jameson Rook. In the wake of their recent breakup, Nikki would rather not deal with their raw emotional baggage. But the handsome, wise-cracking Pulitzer Prize-winning writer's personal involvement in the case forces her to team up with Rook anyway. The residue of their unresolved romantic conflict and crackling sexual tension fills the air as Heat and Rook embark on a search for a killer among celebrities and mobsters, singers and hookers, pro athletes and shamed politicians.

This new, explosive case brings on the heat in the glittery world of secrets, cover-ups, and scandals." -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this second book of the Nikki Heat series.  It's was fun remembering scenes from the television series Castle and seeing how they are portrayed in the book. I also enjoyed seeing the character Richard Castle thank the actors in the acknowledgements.I look forward to reading the third book - Heat Rises.
Friday, August 31st, 2012
8:16 pm
32. Plague of Coins by Aiden James
Title: Plague of Coins
Author: Aiden James
Publisher: Aiden James Fiction
Year: 2011
# of pages: 221
Date read: 8/30/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

William Barrow carries a dark secret. A very dark secret.

An archivist for the Smithsonian Institute and also a part-time
operative for the CIA, no one would ever suspect the handsome
‘thirty-ish’ William is in fact the most reviled human being to ever
walk the earth. His infectious warmth and sense of humor make such an
assertion especially hard to believe.

But long ago, William Barrow had another name…one that is synonymous with shame and betrayal: Judas Iscariot.

Forced to walk the earth as a cursed immortal, William/Judas is on a
quest to reclaim the thirty silver shekels paid to him in exchange for
Jesus Christ. Twenty-one coins have now been recovered—thanks in large
part to the help from his latest son, the esteemed Georgetown University
history professor, Alistair Barrow.

Ever hopeful the complete coin collection will buy him a full pardon
from God and end his banishment from heaven, William plans a visit to a
remote village deep within Iran’s Alborz Mountains to retrieve ‘silver
coin number twenty-two’. But the CIA has a different objective for this
trip, one that pits both father and son against an unscrupulous Russian
billionaire searching for something else that’s just as precious within
the ancient mountains of Iran…something that threatens peace in the
modern world if William and Alistair fail to reach it first." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

Overall, I enjoyed this thriller featuring William Barrow (aka Judas
Iscariot) and his quest to reclaim another silver shekel. At first,
there was some awkward foreshadowing by Barrow at the beginning, but
after a while it ended, and the pace of the story picked up. I look
forward to reading the next book, Reign of Coins.
Thursday, August 30th, 2012
5:57 pm
31. Touch the Dark by Karen Chance
Title: Touch the Dark
Author: Karen Chance
Publisher: ROC
Year: 2006
# of pages: 307
Date read: 8/29/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good



Description:

"Cassandra Palmer can see the future and communicate with spirits-talents that make her
attractive to the dead and the undead.  The ghosts of the dead
aren't usually dangerous; they just like to talk...a lot.

The undead are another matter.

Like any sensible girl, Cassie tries to avoid vampires.  But when the bloodsucking
Mafioso she escaped three years ago finds Cassie again with vengeance
on his mind, she's forced to turn to the vampire Senate for protection.
The undead senators won't help her for nothing, and Cassie finds
herself working with one of their most powerful members, a dangerously
seductive master vampire-and the price he demands may be more than
Cassie is willing to pay..." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this first book of the Cassandra Palmer series. I like the mix
of characters and the way Cassie learned that things were not as she
thought. I look forward to reading the next book, Claimed by Shadow.
Friday, August 24th, 2012
5:51 pm
30. Heat Wave by Richard Castle
Title: Heat Wave
Author: Richard Castle
Publisher: Hyperion
Year: 2010
# of pages: 196
Date read: 8/23/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Mystery sensation Richard Castle, blockbuster author of the wildly
bestselling Derrick Storm novels, introduces his newest character, NYPD
Homicide Detective Nikki Heat. Tough, sexy, professional Nikki Heat
carries a passion for justice as she leads one of New York City's top
homicide squads. She's hit with an unexpected challenge when the
commissioner assigns superstar magazine journalist Jameson Rook to ride
along with her to research an article on New York's Finest. Pulitzer
Prize-winning Rook is as much a handful as he is handsome. His wise
cracking and meddling aren't her only problems. As she works to unravel
the secrets of a murdered real estate tycoon, she must also confront the
spark between her and Rook. The one called heat." -- from the back
cover

My thoughts:

As a fan of the television show Castle, I enjoyed reading the
first book of the "Nikki Heat" series. I not only liked the mystery but I
also liked remembering scenes from the show and seeing the subtle
changes depicted in the book. I look forward to reading the next book, Naked Heat.
Monday, August 20th, 2012
4:31 pm
29. Salt: A World History by Mark Kurlansky
Title: Salt
Author: Mark Murlansky
Publisher: Walker and Company
Year:  2002
# of pages: 449
Date read: 8/19/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good

Description:

"Homer called salt a divine substance. Plato described it as especially
dear to the gods. Today we take it for granted; however, as Mark
Kurlansky so brilliantly relates in this world-encompassing book,
salt-the only rock we eat-has shaped civilization from the very
beginning. Its story is a glittering, often surprising part of the
history of mankind.

Until about 100 years ago, when modern geology
revealed how prevalent it is, salt was one of the most sought-after
commodities, for without it humans and animals could not live. Salt has
often been considered so valuable that it served as currency, and it is
still exchanged as such in places today. Demand for salt established
the earliest trade routes, across unknown oceans and the remotest of
deserts: the city of Jericho was founded almost 10,000 years ago as a
salt trading center. Because of its worth, salt has provoked and
financed some wars; it was, as well, a strategic element in the American
Revolution and the Civil War, among other conflicts. Salt taxes
secured empires across Europe and Asia and have also inspired revolution
(Gandhi's salt march in 1930 began the overthrow of British rule in
India); indeed, salt has been central to the age-old debate about the
rights of government to tax and control economies.

The story of salt encompasses fields as disparate as engineering, religion, and
food, all of which Kurlansky richly explores. Few endeavors have
inspired more ingenuity than salt making, from the natural gas furnaces
of ancient China to the drilling techniques that led to the age of
petroleum, and salt revenues have funded some of the greatest public
works in history, including the Erie Canal and the Great Wall of China.
Salt's ability to preserve and to sustain life has made it a
metaphorical symbol in all religions. Just as significantly, salt has
shaped the history of foods like cheese, sauerkraut, olives, and more,
and Kurlansky conveys, in his saga and through 40 historic recipes-how
they have in turn molded civilization and eating habits the world over.

Salt: A World History is veined with colorful characters, from
Li Bing, the Chinese bureaucrat who built the world's first dam in 250
BC, to Pattillo Higgins and Anthony Lucas who, ignoring the advice of
geologists, drilled an east Texas salt dome in 1901 and discovered an
oil reserve so large it gave birth to the age of petroleum. From the
sinking salt towns of Cheshire in England to the ancient salt work in
southern San Francisco Bay; from the remotest islands in the Caribbean
where roads are made of salt to rural Sichaun province where the last
home-made soya sauce is produced, Mark Kurlansky has produced a
kaleidoscope of history, a multi-layered masterpiece that blends
economic, scientific, political, religious, and culinary records into a
rich and memorable tale." -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

This was a thoroughly informative book on salt and its impact on world
history. I learned many new things including the fact that the word stem
"-wich" as in Norwich means salt works and that there's a rock salt
mine 1,200 feet below Detroit.
Wednesday, August 15th, 2012
4:03 pm
28. Real Murders by Charlaine Harris
Title: Real Murders
Author: Charlaine Harris
Publisher: Worldwide
Year: 1990
# of pages: 252
Date read: 8/14/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Every month, Real Murders, a society of crime buffs in Lawrenceton, Georgia, met to discuss a favorite infamous murder. Its members were an eccentric lot: Gifford Doakes, the massacre specialist; Jane Engle, lover of Victorian horrors; Perry Allison, a Ted Bundy fan. . .

The night of the last meeting, town librarian Aurora 'Roe' Teagarden discovered Mamie Wright's mutilated body in the clubhouse kitchen. She felt certain the killer was a fellow murder, for the crime bore a chilling resemblance to the club's 'murder of the month.'

And as other brutal 'copycat' killings followed, the only motive seemed a horrifying bizarre sense of fun. . . ." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this mystery featuring a librarian trying to discover who was copying well-known murders from the past. I look forward to reading the next book in the series, A Bone to Pick.
Tuesday, July 24th, 2012
11:09 am
27. Trader to the Stars by Poul Anderson
Title: Trader to the Stars
Author: Poul Anderson
Publisher: Panther
Year: 1965
# of pages: 155
Date read: 7/23/2012
Rating: 3*/5

Description:

"Their space-yacht, pursued by angry Adderkops thirsting for their blood, has run into serious engine trouble. Picking up the trail of another alien spaceship, they decide to board it and force its crew to take them home. But once aboard, its not so easy to find the crew: they're faced with cages full of bizarre, other-worldly animals: Tiger apes, Elephantoids, Gorilloids, Caterpiggles, Helmet beasts, Tentacle centaurs. One set of these extraordinary creatures must be the crew, in hiding. But which? Survival depends on finding the right answer. . .

And this is just the first of the problems facing Poul Anderson's intrepid space-merchant venturers in this masterly SF book!" -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I liked this science fiction book of space-faring traders. I especially liked the challenge in the first story of trying to determine who were the crew and the cultural misunderstandings depicted in the last story. I look forward to reading the first book in the series, War of the Wing-Men.
Friday, July 6th, 2012
10:53 am
26. Hope: A Tragedy by Shalom Auslander
Title: Hope: A Tragedy
Author: Shalom Auslander
Publisher: Riverhead Books
Year: 2012
# of pages: 292
Date read: 7/5/2012
Rating: 4*/5 = great

Description:

The rural town of Stockton, New York, is famous for nothing: no one was born there, no one died there, nothing of any historical import has ever happened there, which is exactly why Solomon Kugel, like other urbanites fleeing their pasts and histories, decided to move his family there.

To begin again. To start anew. But it isn't quite working out that way for Kugel. . . .

His ailing mother stubbornly holds on to life, and won't stop reminiscing about the Nazi concentration camps she never actually suffered through. To complicate matters further, some lunatic is burning down farmhouses just like the one Kugel bought, and when, one night, he discovers history -- a living, breathing, thought-to-be-dead specimen of history -- hiding upstairs in his attic, bad very quickly becomes worse.

Hope: A Tragedy is a hilarious and haunting examination of the burdens and abuse of history, propelled with unstoppable rhythm and filled with existential musings and mordant wit. It is a comic and compelling story of the hopeless longing to be free of those pasts that haunt our every present." -- from the inside flap

My thoughts:

From the first page to the last, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I especially liked Solomon's quest for the perfect dying words and his conversations with the doctor and the person in his attic.
Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012
9:16 pm
25. Icon by Frederick Forsyth
Title: Icon
Author: Frederick Forysth
Publisher: Bantam Books
Year: 1996
# of pages: 567
Date read: 7/2/2012
Rating: 3*/5 = good


Description:

"Summer 1999. Russia stands on the threshold of anarchy. An interim
president sits powerless in Moscow as his nation is wracked by famine
and inflation, crime and corruption, and seething hordes of the
unemployed roam the streets. For them, only one man holds out
hope. The striking voice of Igor Komarov, waiting in the wings for the
presidential election of January 2000, rings out over the airwaves,
mesmerizing the masses with the promise of law, order, and
prosperity--and the return to glory of their once great land.

Then a document falls into the hands of British Intelligence. Quickly
dubbed the Black Manifesto, it outlines Komarov's secret plan for the
regime as autocratic and evil as Hitler's Third Reich. Officially the
West can do nothing, but in secret a group of elder statesmen sends the
only person who can expose the truth about Komarov into the heart of the
inferno. Ex-CIA agent Jason Monk has a dual mission: to stop Komarov,
whatever it takes, and to prepare the way for an icon worthy of the
Russian people.  But to do this, Monk must stay alive--and the forces allied against him are ruthless, the time frighteningly short...

Only
Frederick Forsyth, the unparalleled master of the novel of
international intrigue, could create this riveting thriller, as timely
and unsettling as tomorrow's headlines." -- from the first page insert.

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this fast-moving thriller with its mix of real and fictional
events. I especially liked the twists and turns with surprises around
almost every corner.

Progress:

25 / 100 books. 25% done!

8529 / 30000 pages. 28% done!
Thursday, June 21st, 2012
1:44 pm
24. Magic for Beginners by Kelly Link
Title: Magic for Beginners
Author: Kelly Link
Publisher: Harper Perennial
Year: 2005
# of pages: 271
Date read: 6/20/2012
Rating: 4*/5 = great

Description:

"Magic for Beginners is many things. Sweetly strange. Liberally scattered with brilliance. A magical lens on the stuff of life that moves and makes us. These are stories of the real world made beautifully unreal: of transformation, love, zombies and brothers fired from cannons. They are the stories you have been waiting to read." -- from the back cover

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this collection of short stories in which the odd and familiar live side by side. Some of my favorite stories were "Catskin" and "Magic for Beginners."
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